Tag Archives: networking

Photos from the @BarefootWine #beachrescue

Here’s what I was doing last Saturday. Met loads of cool folks, had a blast, and worked on cleaning up Rockaway Beach as part of the Barefoot Wine Beach Rescue. After a couple of hours of collecting trash on the beach to make it “barefoot friendly,” they took us to a bar and plied us with free wine and food.

Given that the first short story in Hot Mess: speculative fiction about climate change, Eric Sipple’s “She Says Goodbye Tomorrow,” is about how changing microclimates affect one woman’s family vineyard, it seemed like a great opportunity to go and meet some people, do some good, and spread the word about the book to people who liked both wine and the environment.

We got picked up from near the BBQ festival in Madison Square Park and they took us out to the Rockaways, we spent a few hours cleaning up trash, then a few more being wined and dined at a gorgeous little waterfront bar (unfortunately I’m blanking on the name). The Barefoot bubbly was delish, the people were interesting and engaging, and I’ve wound up with some great new friends on Twitter because of the day.

Theater & Activism: The Working Theater Company’s 2011 Annual Awards Gala

The Working Theater Company’s gala evening was a breath of fresh air on a musty May evening in New York City.  A friend had invited me to join her table, providing an opportunity for exposure to this inclusive, politically-aware company (mission statement available on their website).

The evening’s speakers were eloquent and their words obviously heartfelt. The company’s dedication to providing a voice for working Americans in the theater was clearly articulated, and they displayed their working process and its results to attendees through a series of short scenes, performed during the meal.

This entertainment included selected scenes from Clifford Odets’ Waiting for Lefty, and hearing the work discussed reminded me of hearing Scottish theater activists talking about John McGrath’s The Cheviot, The Stag and the Black Black Oil.

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Free Levi’s, New Friends

Friday morning, I went to the Levi’s Curve ID fittings in Bryant Park. After arriving at nine a.m. and waiting in line till about eleven, I was joined in line by Nicole Poole, the author of Thrift Store Confidential; we and others near us passed a while discussing fashion and clothing, and I have to say, the lady knows what she’s talking about. Her shoes – from Housing Works, I think – were GORGEOUS. There was another girl in line with us who was bigging up the idea of shopping at Nordstrom and I loved how she kept calling it “a hidden gem.” I know she kept a blog, so if she happens to see this – hi! Comment and send me your blog’s URL!

The system the Levi’s were working under assigned a color-coded band to each “fitting period,” and I got a time at the end of the day. Which was good, as I was donating a couple of giant wardrobes to Housing Works. When I got back and got measured…

…and this is really sad…

…they did not have my size. Now, I’m not a thin girl, and I think I’ve owned up to this on a few occasions. I’m working my way toward it, but no, I’m not there yet. And yet…and yet…the entire concept behind the Levi’s Curve ID Jeans is that they’ve measured women all over the place and found ways to fit us all with jeans. I wouldn’t even have minded getting up early, if someone in the line had mentioned (or if the online materials, which I consulted I think about as closely as most of the users of this brand would check) that the jeans were only made (not in stock, not available on the day, but available in the entire range of produced sizes) up to a size that didn’t include my XL derrier.

Whatever. I met some great ladies in the line (oh – the other two I didn’t mention were a photographer/filmmaker from Ghana and a near-retiree who joined us and who I lost track of; thanks to both of you for livening up the morning!), and my younger sister got rewarded for being of a more typical physique ($59.99 jeans for fre-e-e-e-e-e if you don’t count my time!). Levi’s, you could use a bit more thoughtfulness about either your marketing or your sizing, particularly when you’re advertising a line that’s meant to take the “real woman” and her “real dimensions” into account.